The Circadian Rhythm and Shift Work Disorder

Three sleep disorder experts participated in a recent teleconference series to discuss the recognition and assessment of shift work disorder. Their focus is to help clinicians better understand the pathophysiology, prevalence, and consequences of shift work disorder and how to diagnose this problem when they encounter it in clinical practice.

Part 4
Shift Work Disorder Case Studies: Applying Management Principles in Clinical Practice

Andrew D. Krystal, MD, MS; Thomas Roth, PhD; and Richard D. Simon, Jr, MD

Andrew D. Krystal, MD, MS, Series Chair

Director of the Insomnia and Sleep Research Program

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina

Thomas Roth, PhD

Director of Research, Sleep Disorders and Research Center Henry Ford Hospital Sleep Center

Detroit, Michigan

Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Richard D. Simon, Jr, MD

Medical Director, Kathryn Severyns Dement Sleep Disorders Center

Walla Walla, Washington

Department of Medicine University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

 
Background Information
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Review Process

The faculty for this Brief Report series discussed the content in a peer-review planning teleconference, the chair reviewed the Brief Report series for accuracy, and a member of the Journal Editorial Board who is without conflict of interest reviewed the Brief Report series to determine whether the material is evidence-based and objective.

Acknowledgment

This Brief Report is derived from the planning teleconference series “Recognition and Assessment of Shift Work Disorder,” which was held in June and July 2010.

The teleconference series was chaired by Andrew D. Krystal, MD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Director of the Insomnia and Sleep Research Program, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. The faculty were Thomas Roth, PhD, Director of Research, Sleep Disorders and Research Center, Henry Ford Hospital Sleep Center, Detroit, Michigan, and Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor; and Richard D. Simon, Jr, MD, Medical Director, Kathryn Severyns Dement Sleep Disorders Center, Walla Walla, Washington, and Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.

Financial Disclosure

In the past 12 months, Dr Krystal has received grants/research support from National Institutes of Health, Cephalon, Pfizer, Sunovion/Sepracor, Takeda, Transcept, Phillips-Respironics, Astellas, Abbott, Neosynch, and Brainsway and has served as a consultant for Abbott, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cephalon, Eisai, Eli Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Jazz, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Neurocrine, Novartis, Ortho-McNeil-Janssen, Respironics, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Somnus, Sunovion/Sepracor, Somaxon, Takeda, Transcept, and Kingsdown. In the past 24 months, Dr Roth has received grants from Apnex and Merck; has served as a consultant for Abbott, AstraZeneca, Intec, Jazz, Merck, Neurocrine, Pfizer, Purdue, Sepracor, Shire, Somaxon, Somnus, Steady Sleep Rx, and Transcept; and has been a speaker for Sepracor and Somaxon. Dr Simon is a speaker for Asante Global.

Funding/Support

This evidence-based peer-reviewed Brief Report series was prepared by Healthcare Global Village, Inc. Financial support for the teleconference and preparation of this Brief Report series was provided by an educational grant from Cephalon, Inc. The faculty acknowledges Ruth Ross, MA, Project Manager, Healthcare Global Village, for editorial assistance in developing this Brief Report series.

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed herein are those of the faculty and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher, the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology, Healthcare Global Village, Inc, or the commercial supporter.

doi:10.4088/JCP.11073br0

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