Subscribe to the Journal

Psychiatrist.com Home          Keyword Search

Close [X]

Search Our Sites

Enter search terms below (keywords, titles, authors, or subjects). Then select a category to search and press the Search button. All words are assumed to be required. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotes. To exclude a term, precede it with a minus sign (-).

Keyword search:

Choose a category:

Choosing the appropriate category will greatly improve your chances of finding the best match.

All files at our sites: J Clin Psychiatry, Primary Care Companion, CME Institute, and MedFair

Search materials from our journals:

Abstracts from The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 1996–present, both regular issues and supplements

PDFs of the full text of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 1996–present, both regular issues and supplements (paid subscribers)

PDFs of the full text of The Primary Care Companion, 1999–present

Search CME offerings:

CME Institute, including CME from journals , supplements, and Web activities for instant CME credit (registered users); also includes information about our CME program

CME activities from regular issues of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (registered users)

CME Supplements from The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (registered users)

This special offering is free to registered users.

To read the full article, please register for a free account or choose an option below if you have already registered at Psychiatrist.com.

Commentary: A National Epidemic of Unintentional Prescription Opioid Overdose Deaths: How Physicians Can Help Control It

Leonard J. Paulozzi, MD, MPH; Richard H. Weisler, MD; and Ashwin A. Patkar, MD, MRCPsych

J Clin Psychiatry

doi: 10.5088/JCP.10com06560

Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Both the usage of prescription drugs such as opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines and overdoses involving them have increased dramatically in the United States since the 1990s. Patients using these drugs often have a combination of painful conditions, substance abuse, and other forms of mental illness. Psychiatrists and many primary care physicians might not be familiar with existing evidence-based guidelines for opioid prescribing or with programs designed to reduce the abuse of prescription drugs such as state prescription drug monitoring programs. Psychiatrists need to be informed regarding this problem to partner effectively with both pain specialists and primary care providers in their community.

Like the Journal on Facebook and hear about the latest findings in clinical psychiatry.