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The article you requested is

Psychotherapy Casebook: Midlife Crisis.

Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry 2006;8:373-374
10.4088/PCC.v08n0609

Because this piece does not have an abstract, we have provided for your benefit the first 3 sentences of the full text.

If you follow these articles, it will come as no surprise to you that I’m a big fan of the concept of life stages. For me, this concept is a useful way to think about the transitions we all go through in life: starting a new school, finding a life partner, embarking on a career, having a child, moving to a new place, beginning a new job, children leaving home, retirement, death of a spouse. I could go on and on. This concept of beginning a new life stage can be effectively applied, as well, to a person told by a physician that he or she has been diagnosed with a major illness (e.g., cancer). In each case, the task requires an adjustment to the changes (or restrictions) imposed by the new stage in life.​