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The article you requested is

ASCP Corner: Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors Revisited: What You Should Know

J Clin Psychiatry 2013;74(2):189-191
10.4088/JCP.12ac08299

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Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) have been dubbed the “secret weapon” of psychopharmacology for the treatment of depression. While pharmacology futurists await the arrival of so-called “triple reuptake inhibitors” as harbingers of the next generation of antidepressants, MAOIs—which simultaneously enhance serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic transmission—have been available for decades. Elegant combination therapies for hard-to-treat depression often aim to increase central activity of all 3 monoamines (such as by combining a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with a putative dopaminergic drug [eg, bupropion, amphetamine, methylphenidate, or pramipexole] or by pairing a dopamine agonist with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI] plus a tricyclic antidepressant [TCA]).