Psychoeducation for Patients With a Psychotic Disorder: Effects on Knowledge and Coping

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Objective: Psychoeducation is an essential and promising element in the nonpharmacologic treatment of patients with a psychotic disorder. This study examined the effects of patient-directed psychoeducation on knowledge and coping.

Method: This study included 99 primary care patients with a psychotic disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria who completed a knowledge questionnaire before and a knowledge and coping questionnaire halfway through, immediately after, and 6 months after a 20-session group psychoeducation program. The first time the program was given was between April and October 2007, and the final time the program was given was between October 2009 and April 2010. Results were analyzed with multilevel analysis.

Results: Knowledge increased significantly from the beginning of the program to halfway through the program (P < .001), even after correction for baseline scores, but not any further thereafter. Coping improved from halfway through the program to the end of the program (P = .02), also after correction for baseline scores, but not thereafter. Only at 6 months after the program was knowledge related to coping (P = .01). There were no differences in knowledge and coping between male and female patients. Halfway through (P = .001) and at the end of the program (P = .02), the increase in knowledge was significantly lower for patients taking atypical antipsychotic medication than for patients taking typical antipsychotic medication.

Conclusions: In patients with a psychotic disorder, psychoeducation results in more knowledge immediately and several months after the program and contributes to better coping only immediately after the program. Patients with more knowledge several months after psychoeducation may also be patients who then cope better with the disorder.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2011;13(4):doi:10.4088/PCC.10m01116

Submitted: November 22, 2010; accepted March 2, 2011.

Published online: August 4, 2011 (doi:10.4088/PCC.10m01116).

Corresponding author: Ercolie R. Bossema, PhD, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, PO box 80.140, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands (e.r.bossema@uu.nl).

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2011;13(4):doi:10.4088/PCC.10m01116

https://doi.org/10.4088/PCC.10m01116