This work may not be copied, distributed, displayed, published, reproduced, transmitted, modified, posted, sold, licensed, or used for commercial purposes. By downloading this file, you are agreeing to the publisher’s Terms & Conditions.

Brainstorms

Does Evidence From Clinical Trials in Psychopharmacology Apply in Clinical Practice?

Stephen M. Stahl

Published: January 1, 2001

Article Abstract
Trying to use clinical trial data as a beacon to guide the use of new drugs in clinical practice can lead to errant expectations. Consider the story of the police officer who encountered a man looking for something near a street light after dark:

"What are you doing?" asked the police officer.
"Looking for the coin I dropped a little while ago down the street," replied the man.
"Why are you looking here instead of down the street where you dropped it?" queried the police officer.
"Because this is where the light is shining," answered the man.

Just because the light of research shines on a population of patients in a clinical trial doesn’ t always mean it will illuminate patients in clinical practice. Why is this so?


Some JCP and PCC articles are available in PDF format only. Please click the PDF link at the top of this page to access the full text.

Related Articles

Volume: 62

Quick Links: Assessment Methods , Research Methods Statistics

Sign-up to stay
up-to-date today!

SUBSCRIBE

Already registered? Sign In

Original Research

Sublingual Dexmedetomidine for the Treatment of Acute Agitation in Adults With Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

This RCT determined whether a single dose of sublingual dexmedetomidine reduced acute agitation associated with schizophrenia or...

Read More...