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Academic Highlights

Review of the Pharmacologic Management of Depression.

Michael E. Thase, M.D.; Maurizio Fava, M.D.; Mark Zimmerman, M.D.; and Larry Culpepper, M.D., M.P.H.

Published: March 15, 2006

Article Abstract

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Michael E. Thase, M.D., began his presentation by stating that remission can be defined as a virtually complete relief of symptoms; that is, a level of symptoms basically indistinguishable from that of someone who has never been depressed. In depression, remission is usually understood to mean the optimal level of improvement for the acute phase treatment of an episode of major depressive disorder. Being in remission means that the individual has been able to return to a normal level of social functioning.


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Volume: 67

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