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In Memoriam

Lori L. Altshuler, MD (1957-2015)

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Lori L. Altshuler, MD

1957-2015

Figure 1

Lori L. Altshuler, MD, died on November 5, 2015, at her home in Manhattan Beach, California. It is easy to list Lori’s many important contributions to psychiatry, but doing so describes only one facet of a wonderfully multidimensional and talented person. Yes, Lori held the Julia S. Gouw Endowed Chair in Mood Disorders at UCLA. Yes, she published more than 265 peer-reviewed articles. Yes, she made major contributions to our understanding of the biology and treatment of both bipolar disorder and women’s mental health. And yes, she was both a generous mentor and a truly outstanding clinician.

But Lori was so much more than her professional accomplishments. Lori was one of the most thoughtful and intentional people I have ever known. She was the rare person who can take a step back and take a hard look at herself, her family, and her career and set priorities. Lori made her boys, Eric and Daniel, the priority in her life. She was a remarkable single parent who cared deeply for her children. She was also a thoughtful daughter who was concerned about her parents and their well-being. She had a wonderful relationship with her husband, Greg, and was proud of his work as a nationally recognized arborist.

Again, though, Lori’s family life was just one facet of this richly complex person. Lori was adventurous and fun-loving, whether rollerblading with girlfriends on the Manhattan Beach boardwalk, riding bicycles with mentees on her way to work, or hiking with friends in the mountains. She had a real joie de vivre that stayed with her despite a long struggle with metastatic cancer.

Lori was quietly charismatic. When she was with you, she was truly present. Her observations and questions were perceptive and frequently thought-provoking. Her capacity to care for others was remarkable. Lori was a great friend to those who were lucky enough to really get to know her.

In closing, Lori was a person who truly made the world a better place. I know many people feel that Lori added richness to their lives, and she will be greatly missed.

Mark H. Rapaport, MD

J Clin Psychiatry 2016;77(3):333

dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.16f10701

© Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

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