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Letters To the Editor

Reply to Problems in Assessing Musical Hallucination

Haggai Hermesh, MD; Ruth Gross-Isseroff, DSc; Shai Konas, MD; Roni Shiloh, MD; Abraham Weizman, MD; Sofi Marom, PhD; and Reuven Dar, PhD

Published: January 15, 2005

Article Abstract

Because this piece does not have an abstract, we have provided for your benefit the first 3 sentences of the full text.

Sir: We thank Dr. Teunisse for his comments regarding our article on musical hallucinations (MH)/musical obsessions(MO). His first concern was that the 2 questions we used to assess MH may have caused a biased rate of MH in different mental diagnoses, due to more false-negative responses among psychotic patients. However, as mentioned in the Method section, following the 2 direct questions on MH/MO, the patients should also have been able to provide many more details on their past MH experience.’ ‹


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Volume: 66

Quick Links: Psychiatry

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