LAIs for Schizophrenia: An Expert-Driven Psychiatry Case

Christoph Correll, MD reviews three case reports for patients with schizophrenia who may be candidates for switching to long acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics from oral medication.

In this Expert-Driven Psychiatric Case, this renowned psychiatrist reviews the case reports of three patients–James, Joanna, and Tom–with schizophrenia who are candidates for switching from oral antipsychotic treatment to LAIs. “Long acting injectable antipsychotics, or LAIs, have the potential to reduce non-adherence, relapse, rehospitalization, and even mortality, even among patients with first episode schizophrenia and with comorbid substance use disorder,” explains Christoph Correll, MD. 

Through a series of eight brief episodes, Dr. Correll will:

  • Introduce the three patients: Two males, one female who range in age from 21-43
  • Share insights that highlights patient, clinician, and caregiver responses to LAIs
  • Present research data that supports the benefits of LAIs
  • Review the process for selecting a treatment path that includes LAIs, and why 
  • Show how to respond to breakthrough psychosis or continued relapse
  • Explain the role of LAIs with or without oral medication to avoid further psychosis 

This deep dive into the clinically relevant and impactful role of LAIs will explain why Dr. Correll calls long acting injectables a “seatbelt on the road to recovery and success” for a breadth of patients living with schizophrenia.

In this expert-driven psychiatry case, Christoph Correll, MD reviews three case reports for patients with schizophrenia who may be candidates to switch to long acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics from oral medication. In this full-length video, he will:
  • Introduce the three patients: 2 males, one female who range in age from 21-43
  • Share data that highlights patient, clinician, and caregiver response to LAIs
  • Share research that highlights the benefits of LAIs
  • How to respond to breakthrough psychosis or continued relapse
  • The role of LAIs with or without oral medication to avoid further psychosis

 

Presented by The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry and Dramatic Health.Christoph Correll, MD, is professor of psychiatry at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and a medical director of the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) program at Zucker Hillside Hospital.Access clinical resources and learn more at Psychiatrist.com.

About Christoph U. Correll, MD


Christoph U. Correll, MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
Hempstead, NY

Christoph Correll is currently Professor of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA and Medical Director of the Recognition and Prevention (RAP) programme at the Zucker Hillside Hospital, New York, USA. He is a board certified general psychiatrist and child and adolescent psychiatrist.

Professor Correll’s research and clinical work focuses on the identification, characterization and treatment of adults and youths with severe psychiatric disorders. His areas of expertise include the prodrome, first episode, multi-episode and refractory illness phase of severe psychotic and mood disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, as well as aggressive spectrum disorders. He further focuses on the risk-benefit evaluation of psychotropic medications, including the extent and mechanisms of cardiometabolic and neuromotor adverse effects.

Professor Correll has authored or co-authored over 200 journal articles. He has served on several expert consensus panels on the use of antipsychotics across a range of psychiatric disorders, is a reviewer for over 70 peer-reviewed journals and an editorial board member of 11 scientific journals. He is the principal investigator or Steering Committee member of several large, federally funded grants and has received over two dozen national and international research awards and fellowships for his work.

Since 2014, the year of inception of this metric, he has been listed every year by Clarivate/Web of Science as one of the “most influential scientific minds” and “top 1% cited scientists in the area of psychiatry.”

SCHIZOPHRENIA RESOURCES

 

Schizophrenia Clinical Resource Center

Psychopharmacology Clinical Resource Center

The Use of Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: Evaluating the Evidence (J Clin Psychiatry 2016)

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