This work may not be copied, distributed, displayed, published, reproduced, transmitted, modified, posted, sold, licensed, or used for commercial purposes. By downloading this file, you are agreeing to the publisher’s Terms & Conditions.

Original Research

Effects of 1-Year Treatment With Highly Purified Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Depression After Myocardial Infarction: Results From the OMEGA Trial

Reinhilde Zimmer, MD; Thomas Riemer, MD; Bernhard Rauch, MD; Steffen Schneider, PhD; Rudolf Schiele, MD; Helmut Gohlke, MD; Frank Diller; Gerhard Steinbeck, MD; Hugo Katus, MD; and Jochen Senges, MD; for the OMEGA-Study Group

Published: November 15, 2013

Article Abstract

Objective: The effects of supplementation of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on prevalence and severity of depression were evaluated in patients after a myocardial infarction.

Method: A cross-sectional evaluation (posttest-only design) within the prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter OMEGA trial was performed in patients after myocardial infarction at 12 months’ follow-up (N = 2,081; age, mean = 64 years; men, 76.7%; women, 21.8%) from April 2005 to June 2007. Patients received supplementation with ethyl esters 90 (460-mg EPA and 380-mg DHA) or placebo for 12 months. Depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II); a BDI-II cutoff score of ≥ 14 was used as diagnosis of depression.

Results: When the total population was evaluated, no effects of EPA/DHA supplementation on depressive symptoms according to BDI-II score (mean [SD]) could be demonstrated: EPA/DHA (n = 1,046), 7.1 (6.9); placebo (n = 1,035), 7.1 (7.0); P = .7. The post hoc analyses of depressed patients with and without antidepressants revealed a tendency toward an antidepressant effect in patients with EPA/DHA supplementation as monotherapy: EPA/DHA (n = 125), 19.4 (5.8); placebo (n = 113), 19.9 (5.1); P = .07. However, in depressed patients with EPA/DHA supplementation as adjunctive to conventional antidepressants, a clinically relevant antidepressant effect was demonstrated: EPA/DHA (n = 33), 20.9 (7.1); placebo (n = 29), 24.9 (8.5); P < .05.

Conclusions: EPA/DHA supplementation in the total sample of patients after myocardial infarction had no effect on depressive symptoms. The clinically relevant antidepressant effect in the subgroup of depressed patients with EPA/DHA supplementation as adjunctive to conventional antidepressants that was revealed in the post hoc analysis might provide a basis for a controlled, prospective trial of omega-3 augmentation of antidepressants in patients after myocardial infarction.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00251134

J Clin Psychiatry 2013;74(11):e1037-e1045

Submitted: March 2, 2013; accepted July 25, 2013 (doi:10.4088/JCP.13m08453).

Corresponding author: Reinhilde Zimmer, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Meisenweg 7, DE-82237 Wörthsee, Germany (reinhilde.zimmer@lrz.tu-muenchen.de).

Volume: 74

Quick Links: Depression (MDD)

Continue Reading…

Subscribe to read the entire article

$40.00

Buy this Article as a PDF

References

Sign-up to stay
up-to-date today!

SUBSCRIBE

Already registered? Sign In

Clinical and Practical Psychopharmacology

Skeletal and Dental Fractures Associated With Electroconvulsive Therapy

Recent data suggest the risk of skeletal or dental fracture with ECT may be as low as...

Read More...