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Letters to the Editor

A Ginkgo Biloba-Associated Paranoid Reaction

Timothy R. Berigan, DDS, MD; and Benjamin W. Page, MD

Published: October 1, 2000

Article Abstract

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Sir: An increasing number of Americans are turning towardherbal medicines to treat their health problems. It is estimatedthat 25% of Americans seeking medical care use alternativetherapies for their problems.1 However, approximately 70% ofthese patients do not inform their physicians about their useof herbal medicines.2 Herbal medicines may elicit changes inmood, thinking, or behavior,3 which may not initially be consideredby a physician in the differential diagnosis. We report a casein which a patient with no previous psychiatric history developedovert paranoid ideation after treatment with Ginkgo biloba.


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Volume: 2

Quick Links: Cognition , Neurologic and Neurocognitive

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