An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Study of a Healthy Living Intervention in Early Intervention Services for Psychosis: the INTERvention to Encourage ACTivity, Improve Diet, and Reduce Weight Gain (INTERACT) Study

Karina Lovell, PhD; Alison Wearden, PhD; Tim Bradshaw, PhD; Barbara Tomenson, MSc; Rebecca Pedley, BSc; Linda M. Davies, MSc; Nusrat Husain, MD; Adrine Woodham, MA; Diane Escott, PhD; Caroline M. Swarbrick, PhD; Omolade Femi-Ajao, MSc; Jeff Warburton, MA; and Max Marshall, MD

Published: May 15, 2014

Article Abstract

Background: People with psychosis often experience weight gain, which places them at risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and early death.

Objective: To determine the uptake, adherence, and clinical effectiveness of a healthy living intervention designed to reduce weight gain.

Method: An exploratory randomized controlled trial, comparing the intervention with treatment as usual (TAU) in 2 early intervention services for psychosis in England. DSM-IV classification was the diagnostic criteria used to assign the psychiatric diagnoses. The primary outcome was change in body mass index (BMI) from baseline to 12-month follow-up. The study was conducted between February 2009 and October 2012.

Results: 105 service users, with a BMI of ≥ 25 (≥ 24 in South Asians), were randomized to intervention (n = 54) or TAU (n = 51) after stratification by recent commencement of antipsychotic medication. Ninety-three service users (89%) were followed up at 12 months. Between-group difference in change in BMI was not significant (effect size = 0.11). The effect of the intervention was larger (effect size = 0.54, not significant) in 15 intervention (28%) and 10 TAU (20%) participants who were taking olanzapine or clozapine at randomization.

Conclusions: The healthy living intervention did not show a significant difference in BMI reduction compared to the TAU group.

Trial Registration: www.isrctn.org identifier: ISRCTN22581937

Volume: 75

Quick Links: Psychotic Disorders , Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorders

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